Jeffrey Schultz – VIII. Papers Please

Jeffrey Schultz

VIII. Papers Please

 

I hear nothing
In language
But what’s lost
Beyond the border
Of a frontier
So far forgotten
It cannot be mourned
And whatever
It is its name was
Doesn’t even
Bother to taste
Of ash and never
Gets caught
Anyway in anyone’s
Teeth. I mean,
The 60s for Christ’s sake…
Or to think of one’s youth
As anything at all
And then go on
To make a whole thing of it…
In the 90s
I read about the 60s
What did I feel or do?
What did I see?
Who knows? I tell
The same stories
Over and over
Every year. I embellish
Freely to keep
Myself from becoming
Too much over-bored.
I don’t remember
People’s names
Nor what was
Or wasn’t real
And am concerned
Little if at all.

 

Jeffrey Schultz’s artist statement:

Title of series: Fifteen Variations on Themes from Levis.
In a series of fifteen brief variations, Schultz will meditate on a number of themes–some of them poorly recalled from memory, some of them badly obscured or poorly understood–from Levis’s work.

Marisol Baca – Remedios Sketch 1

Marisol Baca

Remedios Sketch 1

{I see her in the mirror, through a window, as close as a collision}
 

Solitary corseted friend
there is no laughter in this image
she could be hiding a baguette
a basket of warmed tortillas
a pallet of pears
food for a journey

 

Marisol Baca’s artist statement:

Over the past 15 days, I have been writing a poem a day. This concentrated workload allowed me to sit face-to-face with poems that I have been wanting to write for a long time— stories that I have wanted to investigate for a long time. It was a difficult thing to do, but the right time to do it. These poems are about exploring the work of a favorite artist of mine and finding out more about my family history. The first eight poems are interrelated and are about the surrealist painter, Remedios Varo. Her paintings evoke wonder and curiosity in me, and I love them. The second set of poems deal with stories about my great grandmother and her sisters. There are some stories in these poems that I have been thinking about for a long time, maybe even years, and have not been able to write until now. Last week I had a dream about my great grandmother standing at the entrance of a doorway telling me to go ahead and get it done. So I did.

“Personaje”
Personaje, 1961.
Oil and Silver / Cardboard Sheet.
© All Rights Reserved 2015, Remedios Varo.
For any use or reproduction of the work, please contact vegap.
Cat.315-Character-1961

“in eights // octaves”
El Flautista, 1955.
Oil and Nacre Embedded / Masonite.
© Copyright 2019.
For any use or reproduction of work, please contact vegap.
Cat. 127-El-Flutista-1955.

Anthony Cody – Everywhere I sleep, 14 of 15

Anthony Cody

Everywhere I sleep, I see Dust Bowl (14 of 15)

Multimedia collage: “Converse Basin was logged of most of its giant sequoias between 1892 and 1918. Some 60- 100 large specimens survive out of some 6,000.” -wikipedia entry on Converse Basin California

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Anthony Cody’s artist statement:

For 15 consecutive nights, in the summer of 2019, I would scour the public domain for images and sounds related to the Dust Bowl era. Very often, I would return to the imagery of Dorothea Lange in her efforts to document the Dust Bowl via the Farm Security Administration. My final waking moments of each day were centered on meditating upon my discoveries, and each morning I’d awaken, have a cup of coffee, and construct a poem. As an homage to the series, I decided I would create each poem on a 15 inch by 15 inch page. The series centers around my current work, which focuses upon the Dust Bowl, climate change, whiteness, capitalism, and technology.

Jeffrey Schultz – VII. Small Infinities

Jeffrey Schultz

VII. Small Infinities

 

The average universe
Is remarkably small
And fits easily enough
Along with all the others
Inside this one.
Even among the little ones,
There’s an enormous range
In terms of both size and complexity.
Findings demonstrate, that is,
A substantially unequal distribution
Of wealth in this regard,
As in all other regards.
Hierarchy is real.
But the system itself
Is dynamic: present reality
Can make no special claim
With regard to potential reality.
Thus the origin of tragedy.
People think, for instance,
The stone does not know
And cannot learn,
And the stone
Likewise vice versa.

 

Jeffrey Schultz’s artist statement:

Title of series: Fifteen Variations on Themes from Levis.
In a series of fifteen brief variations, Schultz will meditate on a number of themes–some of them poorly recalled from memory, some of them badly obscured or poorly understood–from Levis’s work.

Anthony Cody – Everywhere I sleep, 13 of 15

Anthony Cody

Everywhere I sleep, I see Dust Bowl (13 of 15)

Multimedia collage: From Dorothea Lange’s photograph “U.S. 99 on ridge over Tehachapi Mountains. Heavy truck route between Los Angeles and San Joaquin Valley over which migrants travel back and forth. California.” (May 1939)

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Download a PDF (2.3MB)

 

Anthony Cody’s artist statement:

For 15 consecutive nights, in the summer of 2019, I would scour the public domain for images and sounds related to the Dust Bowl era. Very often, I would return to the imagery of Dorothea Lange in her efforts to document the Dust Bowl via the Farm Security Administration. My final waking moments of each day were centered on meditating upon my discoveries, and each morning I’d awaken, have a cup of coffee, and construct a poem. As an homage to the series, I decided I would create each poem on a 15 inch by 15 inch page. The series centers around my current work, which focuses upon the Dust Bowl, climate change, whiteness, capitalism, and technology.