Anthony Cody – Everywhere I sleep, 10 of 15

Anthony Cody

Everywhere I sleep, I see Dust Bowl (10 of 15)

Multimedia collage: from Dorothea Lange’s photograph “On the plains west of Fresno, California. Family of seven from Oregon dairy ranch which they lost. “We tried to get too big, I guess. Milk cans are all that’s left of the dairy. Now pick bolls to make fty cents to one dollar a day.” (1939)

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Anthony Cody’s artist statement:

For 15 consecutive nights, in the summer of 2019, I would scour the public domain for images and sounds related to the Dust Bowl era. Very often, I would return to the imagery of Dorothea Lange in her efforts to document the Dust Bowl via the Farm Security Administration. My final waking moments of each day were centered on meditating upon my discoveries, and each morning I’d awaken, have a cup of coffee, and construct a poem. As an homage to the series, I decided I would create each poem on a 15 inch by 15 inch page. The series centers around my current work, which focuses upon the Dust Bowl, climate change, whiteness, capitalism, and technology.

Jeffrey Schultz – III. So death blows his little fucking trumpet

Jeffrey Schultz

III. So death blows his little fucking trumpet

 

Never so noble as music,
Poetry was never so noble
As before music recognized
Its own noble distinction,
And, nobly packing up itself
And its whole equipment,
Abandoned poetry for something
More splendid, some splendid
Career. So many resources!
The hair of the horse and catgut
From a sheep and the brazen horns’
Brazenness, the bones of trees hollowed,
And a whole phalanx of men,
Selected and trained from birth
In the discipline of its movements
And, having been dressed appropriately
So as to distract from the beasts they be,
Arranged in seats opposite the seats
Of their noble patrons, who gaze
Upon them as if upon their own pleasure
Objectified, dominated, trained.
That’s guilt, right there. It’s structural.
The difference now isn’t the guilt,
But the music, which is no longer music,
But, so far as I’m able to understand it,
Pills. I know it sounds like
It could almost be music,
But I’m pretty sure what it is is pills.

 

Jeffrey Schultz’s artist statement:

Title of series: Fifteen Variations on Themes from Levis.
In a series of fifteen brief variations, Schultz will meditate on a number of themes–some of them poorly recalled from memory, some of them badly obscured or poorly understood–from Levis’s work.

Anthony Cody – Everywhere I sleep, 9 of 15

Anthony Cody

Everywhere I sleep, I see Dust Bowl (9 of 15)

Multimedia collage: from Dorothea Lange’s photograph “Irrigation pump on edge of eld. Electric power typical of San Joaquin Valley farming. California.” (February 1939)

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Anthony Cody’s artist statement:

For 15 consecutive nights, in the summer of 2019, I would scour the public domain for images and sounds related to the Dust Bowl era. Very often, I would return to the imagery of Dorothea Lange in her efforts to document the Dust Bowl via the Farm Security Administration. My final waking moments of each day were centered on meditating upon my discoveries, and each morning I’d awaken, have a cup of coffee, and construct a poem. As an homage to the series, I decided I would create each poem on a 15 inch by 15 inch page. The series centers around my current work, which focuses upon the Dust Bowl, climate change, whiteness, capitalism, and technology.

Jeffrey Schultz – II. The Oldest Living Thing in L.A.

Jeffrey Schultz

II. The Oldest Living Thing in L.A.

 

By mid-winter the young are no longer
And the winter’s still yet-to-become.
We eat tacos in 90 degree heat
With our friend the anthropologist
From Massachusetts, where seven snows
Yesterday did disclose simultaneously themselves
And disappeared beneath them whole Massachusetts.
His work imagines beginnings:
Summers surveying settlements,
Chiseling bone from beneath the steppe,
Reconstructing, from its absence,
What begins to resemble life.
He likes the writing too, but of course
It’s specialist work and no one reads it.
The old are no longer either, mid-winter.
The cars pass bright and clean.
The old seasons have no hold here,
Nor their stupid fantasy of fertility
Bright-burning, and death rounded-out.
This is a new thing now, and though
All the words remain to describe it,
Though they swirl up from within us
As if they were our nature, sharp and soft,
Sounding from passing traffic, sounding
In their reverberations among the walls
And alleys and all the dead young’s skulls,
Sounding as if they were capable
Of the necessary sounds, none of it does.

 

Jeffrey Schultz’s artist statement:

Title of series: Fifteen Variations on Themes from Levis.
In a series of fifteen brief variations, Schultz will meditate on a number of themes–some of them poorly recalled from memory, some of them badly obscured or poorly understood–from Levis’s work.

Anthony Cody – Everywhere I sleep, 8 of 15

Anthony Cody

Everywhere I sleep, I see Dust Bowl (8 of 15)

Multimedia collage, from Dorothea Lange’s photograph “Between Tulare and Fresno on U.S. 99. See general caption. Family inspect a house trailer with idea of purchase” (May 1939)

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Anthony Cody’s artist statement:

For 15 consecutive nights, in the summer of 2019, I would scour the public domain for images and sounds related to the Dust Bowl era. Very often, I would return to the imagery of Dorothea Lange in her efforts to document the Dust Bowl via the Farm Security Administration. My final waking moments of each day were centered on meditating upon my discoveries, and each morning I’d awaken, have a cup of coffee, and construct a poem. As an homage to the series, I decided I would create each poem on a 15 inch by 15 inch page. The series centers around my current work, which focuses upon the Dust Bowl, climate change, whiteness, capitalism, and technology.